Signals Located That Sponsor Host Pets’ Cells, Making It Possible For Breast Cancer Cells Transition– Sciencedaily

Also in a previous study, Semenza’s group found that HIF-1 induced adult stem cells called mesenchymal stem cells release a signal to nearby breast cancer cells, which made them more likely to spread. The researchers suspected this communication might run both ways and that the stem cells’ presence might also help the cancer to recruit the host animal’s white blood cells. Breast cancers need the support of several types of host cells in order to metastasize, including mesenchymal stem cells and one type of white blood cell, Semenza notes. Studying tumor cells grown in a dish, Semenza’s team used chemicals that blocked the functions of various proteins to map a web of signals flying among breast cancer cells, menenchymal stem cells and white blood cells. One positive feedback loop brought mesenchymal stem cells close in to the breast cancer cells. A separate loop of signals between the stem cells and cancer cells caused the cancer cells to release a chemical “beacon” that drew in white blood cells. The concentrations of all the signals in the web were increased by the presence of HIF-1 — and ultimately, by low-oxygen conditions. The team then used genetic engineering to reduce the levels of the cell-recruiting signals in breast cancer cells and implanted those cells into female mice. Compared with unaltered breast cancer cells, those with reduced recruiting power grew into similar-sized tumors, Semenza says, but were much less likely to spread. All of the breast cancer cells used in the study were so-called triple-negative, meaning they lack receptors for estrogen, progesterone and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, so they do not respond to therapies that target those receptors. In people, triple-negative breast cancers also tend to be more deadly than other breast cancers because they contain more HIF-1, Semenza says. “This study adds to the evidence that a HIF-1 inhibitor drug could be an effective addition to chemotherapy regimens, especially for triple-negative breast cancers,” he says. Several potential drugs of this kind are now in the early stages of development, he notes. Story Source: The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine . Note: Materials may be edited for content and length. Journal Reference: P. Chaturvedi, D. M. Gilkes, N. Takano, G. L.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140522175637.htm

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